Thursday September 21, 2017

States of fragility 2016: understanding violence is a 2016 report by the OECD.

States of Fragility 2016: Understanding Violence takes a long hard look at violence in the world – and what we should do about it. The report showcases emerging thinking about violence, presents a new risk-based approach to monitoring various dimensions of fragility, and looks at financial flows in support of fragile contexts.

Understanding Violence finds that development, peace and security efforts in the developing world have not kept pace with the new reality of violence. We need to dedicate more resources and attention to violence. And to be effective, we need to put people – especially youth – at the centre of our efforts.

(Source: OECD)

Posted by Sherri Sunstrum in GOVERNMENT INFORMATION on Thursday Sep 21, 2017  Comments [0]  Bookmark and Share
Wednesday September 06, 2017

Causes and consequences of open space in U.S. urban areas is a 2016 report, published by the OECD.

The provision of open space is at the heart of a complex arbitration of local public finance and urban quality of life. The amount of open space varies substantially across urban areas. This variation raises some natural questions: What determines the amount of open space in an urban area? How does the amount of open space affect housing prices and local tax revenues? How can we assess whether the amount of open space in urban areas is socially optimal?

(Source: OECD)

Posted by Sherri Sunstrum in GOVERNMENT INFORMATION on Wednesday Sep 06, 2017  Comments [0]  Bookmark and Share
Tuesday September 05, 2017

Engaging public employees for a high-performing civil service is a 2016 report by the OECD.

How can governments reduce workforce costs while ensuring civil servants remain engaged and productive? This report addresses this question, using evidence from the 2014 OECD Survey on Managing Budgeting Constraints: Implications for HRM and Employment in Central Public Administration.

The results clearly illustrate the complex challenges facing civil services, such as how to reduce size and cost while still attracting and retaining high-calibre professional talent.

(Source: OECD)

Posted by Sherri Sunstrum in GOVERNMENT INFORMATION on Tuesday Sep 05, 2017  Comments [0]  Bookmark and Share